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Grow is a platform designed especially for smallholders providing a global farming network with best practices, an online chat and forum, e-training on in the farm training, local in country support, mentoring and assistance with start up financing, last mile distribution and finding customers for their crops.

By equipping smallholders with the appropriate solutions and expertise, grow will help smallholders improve their farming practices to grow better crops, increase their yields, make more income and to ensure increased food security for themselves, their communities and their customers.

FEATURES

 

Our platform will provide farmers information to assist you with your crops, engagement with other farmers all over the world and receive assistance on issues from our agricultural mentors.

 

SHORT GROW APP INTRODUCTION

 

Tioman Grow application will be available for most Android mobile phones. You can find out how to treat your crops, treat soil and plant (crop) diseases, fungi and other pests that are destroying your crops. With location enabled on your phone we can send you weather reports for the season, month, week and you will receive alerts on severe weather approaching your farm.

Follow us:

Step 1

Sign-up

 

To be able to use Grow app, you need to sign up.

 

  • Go to our sign up page
  • Leave your info
  • After you receive confirmation e-mail, you can use our web service until the app is finished. 

Step 2

Send

 

Tell us about the problem you are facing.

 

  • Send us a message with details about the issue and upload photos
  • Describe the best you can the issue and you will get back from our experts.

Step 3

Receive & implement 

 

Implement the solution you received 

 

  • We offer tailor made solutions for your crop and soil issue.
  • There will be someone to assist you with the implementation online.

Step 4

Learn more!

 

Browse our knowledge base. 

 

  • Extensive plant and soil disease database.
  • learn from the solutions we have already provided.

CROPS

Receive information about crops you are growing. We offer you professional assistance from experts in the field, tailored for your case.

IRRIGATION

Find all the latest irrigation and drip irrigation solutions and get help from the experts to make your own.

GROW HEALTHY CROPS

Fight with us against the plant disease and remove pest from the farm. We offer complete solutions, according to your own problem.

SOIL

Find out all the details about growing crops on the soil you own. considering the soil type and area, you will receive the best solution to have healthy crops.

BUY 

Buy the best recommended seeds and soil additives and successfully battle the pests, bacteria and every other kind of plant disease.

SELL

Find then best market and buyer for your crops. With application of our growing methods and help from expert traders, reach the best price for your crops.

COME JOIN US!

 

 

Most of the world’s farmers are smallholders on less than two hectares of land.  Despite producing over 80% of the food consumed in parts of the developing world, smallholders still lack the necessary information, training, high quality seeds and inputs needed for a healthy harvest.  Empowering smallholders to protect their crops from pests, disease and climate pressures represent an important part of the solution to achieve a world free from poverty and hunger, major aims of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals.​

 

Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes and having fun. We’re creative action-takers who are init for the people, the ones we work withand the customers we serve. If you think you’re one of those people, we’d love to hear from you.

WEBSITE

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GROW BLOG

 

Here you will find latest updates and news about the Tioman Grow application and different solutions for easier farming. We will share our knowledge base and inform you about latest and best practices in the field. Please subscribe to our newsletter and be the first to get the news.

SOIL

Find out all the details about growing crops on the soil you own. considering the soil type and area, you will receive the best solution to have healthy crops.

GROW HEALTHY CROPS

Fight with us against the plant disease and remove pest from the farm. We offer complete solutions, according to your own problem.

SELL

Find then best market and buyer for your crops. With application of our growing methods and help from expert traders, reach the best price for your crops.

YOUNG, RICH AND AMBITIOUS: NIGERIA'S "GENTLEMAN FARMERS"

ABEOKUTA, Nigeria - "Come, I'll show you what a potential billion dollars looks like," said P.J. Okocha, opening the door of a small, modern house in southern Nigeria to reveal a thousand yam seedlings. "These thousand plants can make three million seeds," he said, with a broad smile. At just 34, Peter Okocha Junior -- also known as P.J. -- is a high achiever. Okocha cut his teeth in his family's shipping and logistics business, then decided to forge his own path.He identified Nigeria's agricultural sector as one of enormous potential where he can make the most impact. Today, he is a pioneer in hydroponics. "I always knew I wanted to invest in agriculture but I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do," he told AFP."One day, I saw an agro-researcher on Twitter. I contacted him, and said, &39;Hey bro, let's change the world together" His pitch hit home. In a few months, their company PS Nutrac was born. Two years later, tens of thousands of yam plants grow without soil, suspended in water in special greenhouses -- a cutting-edge agricultural technique rarely seen in developing countries. One afternoon in June, young PS Nutrac employees were training a group of old local farmers on a new organic variety of yam. Farming communities have been gutted by an exodus of young people for big cities to carve out a living, said Chief Awufe Ademola, who is in his 60s and owns eight acres (3.2 hectares) of land. In rows before him, the old farmers sat with curved backs and calloused hands. "With the average age of the African farmer hovering just above 60 years of age, it's imperative for the new generation to delve into farming," said Okocha."Nobody wants to do the conventional standing in the hot sun, and sweating and labour that comes out with that, therefore to combine it with data, technology and automatisation, it makes it more attractive." Food challenge Nigeria, which is home to more than 180 million people, is under pressure to produce more food. By 2050, it is expected to become the third most populous country in the world. After the discovery of oil in commercial quantities in the 1950s, Nigeria's prosperous agricultural sector suffered a precipitous decline as successive leaders and investors switched focus entirely. Decades have passed and with the collapse of the railway network, agricultural goods now have to be transported by truck on crumbling roads. There are not enough storage sheds; those that exist are mostly not refrigerated, and there are few processing plants. That means huge amounts of produce go to waste in a country so fertile it can grow everything from avocados to cashews to corn. For example, about four million tonnes of citrus fruits are produced annually, according to US Department of Agriculture figures for 2009. But up to 60 percent goes to waste before getting to the final consumers in urban centres. Meanwhile, Nigeria imports 315 million dollars (270 million euros) of orange concentrate a year, the bulk of national consumption. "Opportunities in agriculture are beyond the imagination," said Buffy Okeke-Ojiudu, the proud owner of a 200-hectare (495-acre) palm oil plantation in the southeast. "The future billionaires in Nigeria will be people investing in agriculture, tech and renewable energy, which are sectors that can create employment, not like the oil sector," said the 34-year-old, whose grandfather was Nigeria's first minister of agriculture.​

Tioman Grow - IFAD launches new agriculture investment fund, looks to strengthen private sector strategy

IFAD launches new agriculture investment fund, looks to strengthen private sector strategy​

WASHINGTON — On Friday, the  announced a new $60 million fund to de-risk investments of small loans in agriculture value chains in Africa.The Agribusiness Capital Fund, or ABC Fund — with contributions from the European Commission, Luxembourg, Africa, Caribbean, and the Pacific group of states, and  — seeks to mobilize about $240 million in private capital. Since its founding, IFAD has been tasked with investing in rural people and helping them improve food security and nutrition while increasing their incomes. In the past decade, the international financial institution has repeatedly run into the same problem: a lack of financing to build the types of businesses that will help rural communities process their crops and link them to markets. The ABC Fund, which will be managed independently, will provide loans of between $25,000 and $1 million to small businesses in order to address the “missing middle” of finance between microfinance and commercial loans. While IFAD’s current mandate does not allow them to provide funding to the private sector, it is using its experience and other programs to help identify a pipeline of potential investments and is funding a facility associated with the fund that will provide technical assistance or support to the small businesses to help them succeed. IFAD hopes that its presence will also help derisk a risky field, both because of the uncertainty associated with agriculture and with the small deal size, said Paul Winters, an associate vice president at IFAD. “We’re helping proactively create a market,” he said. “The pipeline is built on what we can do already.” If the fund is able to attract its $240 million target, Winters said he expects it will impact some 700,000 households. IFAD said that it will look to collect data from beneficiaries to measure impact and will have a learning agenda with the new fund, which was about two years in the making. While it has helped organize the effort, IFAD cannot itself manage a fund or even contribute to it directly, though the organization is working to change that. Agency leaders discussed its private sector strategy at IFAD’s governing council meetings in Rome, Italy, this week, and had conversations around whether it would be able to make these kinds of investments in the future.​

tioman Grow blog how solar water pumps are driving sustainable irrigation

How solar water pumps are driving sustainable irrigation​

The technology around off-grid solar products has seen considerable development over the years, making access to energy easier for millions of people in energy-starved regions. Highlighting the benefits of some of these products, the newly launched Efficiency for Agricultural Technologies campaign by the  has brought the conversation around solar water pumps to the forefront. The agricultural sector employs 40% of the world’s population. Despite this, many of the world’s smallholder farmers, especially those in remote locations, have no access to energy. Over the last few years, however, off-grid solar products, especially solar water pumps for irrigation have revolutionized, to help farmers increase crop yields and income, in addition to making them more climate resilient. Solar water pumps: The current landscape While solar irrigation has been around since the 1970s, only in the last few years has this segment of the sector seen a surge in innovation. Similar to the , new technologies within the solar water pump segment can also help increase income levels. GOGLA has observed that with new products being brought to market, new value chains are created, generating more jobs. So, for us, taking a step into this area of productive use appliances was an obvious next move. Three of our members focus purely on agricultural productive assets; , , and . And we’re not alone -  across agricultural institutes and governments in the developing world too. How technological innovations have transformed solar water pumps Smallholder farmers mainly rely on rainfall to water their crops, leaving them at the mercy of uncertain climatic conditions. In the absence of rain, farmers either resort to manual means of crop irrigation or fossil fuel powered pumps – leaving them overburdened physically and financially. The benefits reaped too are minimum. Smallholder farmers are slowly beginning to experience the benefits of solar pumping. “The pump is our future…,” claimed George Otieno, a farmer from Lake Victoria in Kenya, who recently bought Futurepump’s latest product, the SF2. He added, “If you’ve got this pump, you don’t go into your pocket to go and buy fuel to operate it. You don’t use your energy to operate it. As long as there is sun, the pump works by itself.” Most solar-powered water pumps on the market today have integrated remote monitoring or Internet of Things (IoT) platforms. IoT enables a network of communication between the product and a range of other Internet-enabled devices, both traditional and beyond. Smallholder farmers and manufacturers can monitor and understand their solar pumps better through this uniquely connected network – information that can then be used to further efficiency and productivity. IoT and the rapidly reducing price of solar PV have made access to efficient irrigation easier. Solar water pumps like SunCulture’s RainMaker2 benefit farmers with their in-built platform, ClimateSmart. The platform uses soil sensors and internet-connected weather stations to analyze data and provide customers with weather forecasts and best irrigation timing advice on their mobile devices. The platform also enables digital dry run protection to automatically disable a farmer’s RainMaker2 pump and notify them if their well runs dry. Similarly, Futurepump’s SF2 remote monitoring platform keeps track of the pump’s vital signs and pump utilization – litres of water pumped, area irrigated, fuel savings and other such technical data, which can be beneficial for both distributors and customers. Using IoT to enable remote switch-off also makes it possible for both SunCulture and Futurepump to operate their solar pumps by PAYGo payment models. Substantiating these benefits, a  reported that 45% of farmers using solar pumps saw an increase of 50% or more in their annual incomes compared to rain-fed irrigation.​

drip irrigation tube/pipe installation

Drip irrigation tube/pipe installation​

1. according to the requirements of the design documents, fully check the equipment model, specification, quantity and quality, it is strictly prohibited to use unqualified products. Equipment to be installed shall be kept clean and plastic pipes shall not be thrown, dragged or exposed to sunlight. 2. Install water meters, valves and filters according to design requirements and flow direction marks. The filter and the branch pipe are directly connected through threads. 3. threaded pipe fittings installation need to wrap tape, straight lock mother should be tightened. 4. Before bypass installation, first punch the branch pipe with a special hole punch. When drilling, the hole punch cannot be tilted, and the depth of the drill bit into the pipe shall not exceed 1 / 2 of the pipe diameter; Then press the bypass into the branch pipe. 5. Cut the drip irrigation pipe ( belt ) according to the length slightly larger than the plant row, arrange the drip irrigation pipe ( belt ) along the plant row, and then connect one end with the bypass. 6. After the drip irrigation pipe ( belt ) is installed, open the valve and flush the pipeline with water, then close the valve; Install the plug of drip irrigation pipe ( belt ) at the end of drip irrigation pipe ( belt ); Install the branch pipe plug at the end of the branch pipe. 7. The installation sequence of the whole drip irrigation system is: valve, filter, straight - through, branch pipe, drilling, bypass, drip irrigation pipe ( belt ), flushing pipe and plug.​

Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the world​

One of the biggest modern myths about agriculture is that organic farming is inherently sustainable. It can be, but it isn’t necessarily. After all, soil erosion from chemical-free tilled fields undermined the Roman Empire and other ancient societies . Other agricultural myths hinder recognizing the potential to restore degraded soils to feed the world using fewer agrochemicals. When I embarked on a six-month trip to visit farms around the world to research my forthcoming book,  the innovative farmers I met showed me that regenerative farming practices can restore the world’s agricultural soils. In both the developed and developing worlds, these farmers rapidly rebuilt the fertility of their degraded soil, which then allowed them to maintain high yields using far less fertilizer and fewer pesticides. Their experiences, and the results that I saw on their farms in North and South Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Ghana and Costa Rica, offer compelling evidence that the key to sustaining highly productive agriculture lies in rebuilding healthy, fertile soil. This journey also led me to question three pillars of conventional wisdom about today’s industrialized agrochemical agriculture: that it feeds the world, is a more efficient way to produce food and will be necessary to feed the future. Myth 1: Large-scale agriculture feeds the world today According to a recent U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report, family farms produce over . The FAO also estimates that almost three-quarters of all farms worldwide are  – about 2.5 acres, or the size of a typical city block. Only about 1 percent of Americans are farmers today. Yet most of the world’s farmers work the land to feed themselves and their families. So while conventional industrialized agriculture feeds the developed world, most of the world’s farmers work small family farms. A 2016 Environmental Working Group report  that almost 90 percent of U.S. agricultural exports went to developed countries with few hungry people. Of course the world needs commercial agriculture, unless we all want to live on and work our own farms. But are large industrial farms really the best, let alone the only, way forward? This question leads us to a second myth. Myth 2: Large farms are more efficient Many high-volume industrial processes exhibit efficiencies at large scale that decrease inputs per unit of production. The more widgets you make, the more efficiently you can make each one. But agriculture is different. A 1989 National Research Council study  that “well-managed alternative farming systems nearly always use less synthetic chemical pesticides, fertilizers, and antibiotics per unit of production than conventional farms.” And while mechanization can provide cost and labor efficiencies on large farms, bigger farms do not necessarily produce more food. According to a 1992 agricultural census report, small, diversified farms produce more than twice as much food per acre. Even the  endorses small farms as the way to increase agricultural output in developing nations where food security remains a pressing issue. While large farms excel at producing a lot of a particular crop – like corn or wheat – small diversified farms produce more food and more kinds of food per hectare overall. Myth 3: Conventional farming is necessary to feed the world We’ve all heard proponents of conventional agriculture claim that organic farming is a recipe for global starvation because it produces lower yields. The most extensive yield comparison to date,  of 115 studies, found that organic production averaged almost 20 percent less than conventionally grown crops, a finding similar to those of prior studies. But the study went a step further, comparing crop yields on conventional farms to those on organic farms where cover crops were planted and crops were rotated to build soil health. These techniques shrank the yield gap to below 10 percent. The authors concluded that the actual gap may be much smaller, as they found “.” In other words, the basis for claims that organic agriculture can’t feed the world depend as much on specific farming methods as on the type of farm. Consider too that about a quarter of all food produced worldwide is never eaten. Each year the United States alone throws out , more than enough to feed the nearly 50 million Americans who regularly face hunger. So even taken at face value, the oft-cited yield gap between conventional and organic farming is smaller than the amount of food we routinely throw away. Building healthy soil Conventional farming practices that degrade soil health undermine humanity’s ability to continue feeding everyone . Regenerative practices like those used on the farms and ranches I visited show that we can readily improve soil fertility on both large farms in the U.S. and on small subsistence farms in the tropics. I no longer see debates about the future of agriculture as simply conventional versus organic. In my view, we’ve oversimplified the complexity of the land and underutilized the ingenuity of farmers. I now see adopting farming practices that build soil health as the key to a stable and resilient agriculture. And the farmers I visited had cracked this code, adapting , cover cropping and complex rotations to their particular soil, environmental and socioeconomic conditions. Whether they were organic or still used some fertilizers and pesticides, the farms I visited that adopted this transformational suite of practices all reported harvests that consistently matched or exceeded those from neighboring conventional farms after a short transition period. Another message was as simple as it was clear: Farmers who restored their soil , which translated into higher profits. No matter how one looks at it, we can be certain that agriculture will soon face another revolution. For agriculture today runs on abundant, cheap oil for fuel and to make fertilizer – and our supply of cheap oil will not last forever. There are already enough people on the planet that we have  for the global population on hand at any one time. This simple fact has critical implications for society. So how do we speed the adoption of a more resilient agriculture? Creating demonstration farms would help, as would carrying out system-scale research to evaluate what works best to adapt specific practices to general principles in different settings.We also need to reframe our agricultural policies and subsidies. It makes no sense to continue incentivizing conventional practices that degrade soil fertility. We must begin supporting and rewarding farmers who adopt regenerative practices. Once we see through myths of modern agriculture, practices that build soil health become the lens through which to assess strategies for feeding us all over the long haul. Why am I so confident that regenerative farming practices can prove both productive and economical? The farmers I met showed me they already are. ​

AFRICA’S GROWTH LIES WITH SMALLHOLDER FARMERS

As the world’s population surges towards 9 billion by mid-century, food production has failed to keep pace, creating rising food shortages and a global food crisis ahead, according to the United Nations. To avoid mass starvation, the world needs to produce 70 per cent more food by 2050.The greatest potential to deliver that growth exists in Africa. The African continent is home to 25 per cent of the world’s agricultural land. Yet it produces just 10 per cent of the world’s food. That compares with China, which has just 10 per cent of the world’s agricultural land, but produces 20 per cent of the global food supply.If Africa can now rise to the challenge of upgrading its agricultural output, it will open the way to a takeoff in GDP, greater youth employment, and the potential of positive trade balances and rising currencies.Yet, the continent faces two profound issues in delivering its own agricultural turnaround, with its agricultural industry both rural and fragmented, and built upon smallholder farmers. It is the continent’s rural areas that have been most deprived of resources and investment: with the straight-line consequence that the continent’s core industry continues to under-perform, and under-perform badly.The allure of city living has left rural areas neglected and strained Africa’s urban infrastructure and services, including health, water and sanitation, creating rising social problems and competition for city space. Indeed, Africa is now the fastest urbanizing continent in the world, with 60 per cent of all Africans forecast to be living in cities by 2050, according to UN Habitat.But urban areas are dependent on rural populations for food. Moreover, agriculture holds more power in creating youth employment than any other sector, at a time when 10 million youth are entering the labor market each year in Africa, according to the 2015 Africa Agriculture Status Report (AASR).​

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Grow is a platform designed especially for smallholders providing a global farming network with best practices, an online chat and forum, e-training on in the farm training, local in

country support, Mentoring and assistance with start up financing, last mile distribution and finding customers for their crops.

 

Already a Grow member?

Please sign in here.

Grow is a platform designed especially for smallholders providing a global farming network with best practices, an online chat and forum, e-training on in the farm training, local in country

support, mentoring and assistance with start up financing, last mile distribution and finding customers for their crops.

By equipping smallholders with the appropriate solutions and expertise, grow will help smallholders improve their farming practices to grow better crops, increase their yields, make more income and to ensure increased food security for themselves, their communities and their customers.

Tioman Grow is looking for partners in the agricultural sector, whether in development, research, agri-business or input supply. We are searching for partners and agronomists with good information that farmers can use to improve their crops. If you want to directly contribute to improving the productivity of smallholder farmers around the world, complete this form to become our partner and #Contribute2Change.​

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We have farmers joining from around the word looking for advice to grow better crops. No matter your location, we can connect you to an adviser or agronomist that will help you find the best solution for troubling issue. Join our network and become connected to the like farmers around the world. The platform will soon feature several major languages supported for easier communication.

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